Charles Brandon

Who could imagine , in the warm summer night of the year 1491, when the old knight Sir William Brandon called his four orphaned grandsons near his death bed to tell them his last wishes , that his second grandson, Charles Brandon would become, one day, the King’s friend? And who even thought then that Henry VIII, the second son of the first Tudor King of England, would become King, when everybody thought that Arthur was the one to succeed to the throne ? History has many unexpected turns and old the Almighty God knows what someone’s life will turn into.
Charles Brandon was the son of Sir William Brandon and Elizabeth Bruyn. His life was tumultuous and full of adventures, leaving behind not just a few wives, but also many mistresses. Charles has risen to wealth and prosperity due to two facts: first – his father, Sir William Brandon, who stayed loyal to Henry VII and joined, followed by his younger brother Thomas, the Duke of Buckingham’s rebellion against the usurper Duke of Gloucester . He has died at Bosworth Field, being killed by Richard III himself, the man who usurped the throne in 1483. Second – he successfully retained Henry Tudor VIII’s affections for his lifetime.
His childhood was not as easy as it apparently seems. His mother Elizabeth died in childbirth when Charles was a child. Soon after that, his grandfather died, in 1491. The orphaned boy and his brothers moved to the court, where the King Henry VII took Sir William Brandon’s loyalty to him in consideration and decided to keep the boys at court. His Majesty had two sons , Arthur and Henry, who soon became the boys’ playmates. A few years later, Arthur married and the court moved to Ludlow Castle. It was a decisive moment for Charles, for he had to decide between leaving London with the court of Prince Arthur or remain with Henry, Arthur’s younger brother. The decision was not easy to be taken because both Henry and Arthur were his good friends and, by staying with one, he had to be away from the other. But, in the end, the young Charles did not follow the court, but stayed in London as companion to his childhood friend.
Unlike Henry’s older brother, who was delicate , Charles was robust, healthy and enjoyed many sports. This was a good thing, because he could be the young Duke of York’s companion in the most part of his time. So the two young boys became close friends .When Henry became the King of England, Charles started rising to privileges and his life changed. In a few years, he became the Duke of Suffolk. Once Henry became King, he could trust just in a few people. Due to his natural loyalty and the friendship between them, Charles was one of those Henry trusted in .
Charles met the beautiful and charming young lady Margaret Mortimer. The two married and had a beautiful beginning. When the war against France and Scotland started, Charles had to leave and follow the King and the army, serving His Majesty and the country in hard times. A war was far from being an enjoyable thing, for beyond the political interests and matters, there were many lives that have been sacrificed. Many soldiers that left their wives and children at home found their end on the battlefield. Both France and Scotland were not easy at all to handle, but thanks God, the war ended with England’s victory.
Charles was , first of all, a loyal friend of His Majesty the King of England. The dawn of his life has not been sunny, but the Almighty God gave him much fortune. When everything seemed lost, God extended his hand over him and blessed him with a lifetime and precious friendship then with beautiful, prosperous favors. Charles learned quickly and became, from the orphaned boy, a strong and charming man with many virtues – courage, an athletic body, battle skills and a passion for jousts, hunts, swords and archery. Though, as any man, he had his own faults. Maybe the lack of motherly love turned him into a man with passions for women. Also, he liked to gamble, sometimes he spend nights with friends in taverns , drinking and rambling. He had a slight tendency to become arrogant and unprincipled.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: